Interview with Conor Drum

Conor Drum takes some time to talk to Voice about the show, inspirations, and to give advice to young people.

Interview with Conor Drum

Could you first introduce yourself to the reader?

Hello, I'm Conor Drum. I'm from Dublin but have been living in London for the past few years. I moved over to properly pursue comedy, which means I've worked in several restaurants along the way.

How would you describe your show?

My show is called 'All My Friends Are Dead' because they are all married so they are dead to me. The show explores what it's like being the last remaining singleton in your peer-group, swimming in a world of honeymoons, kids and mortgages.

Why do you want to perform at Edinburgh Festival Fringe?

I have performed several times and I intend to do it every year because it's a phenomenal place to perform and develop. The audiences know comedy and the standard is high. It can be a grind but it's worth every second.

What differentiates it from other festivals?

The fact that it's 3.5 weeks and it's the biggest in the world. The entire comedy community is there for the Fringe. It's wonderful.

Do you think the Fringe has changed over the years? If so, how?

I first arrived in 2012. My venue was way over the other side of the city, but it was a learning curve. I am not sure if the Fringe has changed too much other than the Free Fringe gaining more notoriety.

Are these changes positive or negative?

I think it's a positive thing that acts don't necessarily have to land themselves in £10k worth of debt in order to have a successful run.

What first motivated you to enter the industry? Who were your inspirations?

I had been writing scripts and comedy for years. I have always loved the immediacy of stand-up; you have an idea and you can perform it that same day. I've always been a huge stand-up fan from Billy Connolly to Bill Hicks when I was younger, to sitcoms like Father Ted and even The Simpsons.

If you didn't have your current job, what would you probably be doing?

Complaining about whatever job I'd be doing. To be honest, if I could think of what else I'd be doing, I'd probably be doing it, because comedy is very hard to make a good living at.

If you could have any job in the world, what would it be?

Comedian and actor.

What is your earliest childhood art memory?

I used to be a talented painter, I began taking painting classes from the age of around six. I did my first (of two) oil painting around the same age. It's still in my parents' house.

Do you ever feel any pressure to be a social commentator, or constantly update material to respond to events?

Not really. If I have a good joke I'll do it. I think a lot of comics talk about politics and frankly not much of it is original.

Equally, do you think there has been a shift in public sentiment that has affected your work?

I think a lot of the audience is tired of politics especially Drumpf or Brexit stuff. In saying that, if you have a good joke about anything at all, go ahead and say it.

Describe the last year in 5 words or less.

Mexico, LA, Christmas, Weddings, Work.

If you could work with anybody, from any point in history, who would you pick and why?

I'd love to work with Martin Scorsese; he has directed some of my favourite movies, many of which are wonderfully dark and funny simultaneously. I'll watch anything he does.


Conor Drum: All My Friends Are Dead is performing at Laughing Horse at Bar 50 at 18:00 on 3rd – 27th August. For tickets and more information visit the Ed Fringe website.

Author

Tom Inniss

Tom Inniss Voice Team

Tom is a Politics graduate, and holds a Masters in Journalism. He serves as Editor for Voice, and has an almost unhealthy obsession with Batman. His hobbies include gaming and reading graphic novels - his current go to series is Bill Willingham's Fables.

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