​​Sarah Kendall: One-Seventeen

Good luck? Bad luck? Who can tell?

​​Sarah Kendall: One-Seventeen

Having seen Sarah Kendall perform at the Fringe two years ago, I was really looking forward to sitting down and melting away for an hour, and it was truly hilarious and heart-warming and relaxing like no other show I've seen. Reviewing shows, often back to back, it is rare to be so deeply drawn in by a performer that you vacate all working headspace in favour of sheer comfortable enjoyment – Kendall achieved this and so much more.

The show focuses on the idea of luck. The consequences of decisions or events are only revealed in time, and determining whether something is good luck or bad luck at the time is as accurate as the flip of a coin – no one thing works in isolation. Aptly enough, this premise was tested when her microphone failed partway through the show – yes an immediate inconvenient, perhaps even 'bad luck', but Kendall carried it through so well, it became a comedic point in itself and highlighted her versatility and professionalism.

Kendall has mastered the balance between narrative and comedy - using one to compliment, rather than compensate for, the other. Using stories of fortune and fate from her childhood she transports the Edinburgh audience to Australia, to a starry night, a hospital and a hamster cage with wit and sensitivity. The humour comes from the gut of the tales, cleverly integrated to create a fluid, warm wave of emotion that ripples through the audience transcending age, gender, occupation – we were all suspended in a dreamlike state of awe.

It was fantastic. Sarah Kendall is enchanting in her concept, writing and execution.


For tickets and further information visit the Fringe website.

Author

Sally Trivett

Sally Trivett Voice Team

Sally's interests lie very much within the visual arts and communication. Straddling multiple art forms, including writing, sculpture and film, her work focuses on concept, provoking thought and challenging societal norms.

Recent posts by this author

View more posts by Sally Trivett

0 Comments

Post A Comment

You must be signed in to post a comment. Click here to sign in now

You might also like

The D Road

The D Road

by Daisy Mellor

Read now