How to Win: a new online adventure from multi award-winning game theatre makers

Best Newcomers at Brighton Fringe 2018, game-theatre makers Hidden Track, take their empowering and fun approach to politics & storytelling online in lockdown.

Whilst we can't be together, can we find a way that everyone can win?

About this event

Starts: Thursday 18 June 2020 12:00 PM

Ends: Monday 31 August 2020 12:00 AM

At: https://homemcr.org/event/homemakers/

Organised by: Hidden Track

Hello. We’re going to tell a story together. And we’re going to play a game.

But before we play, we need to decide: how do we win?

'How to Win' is a new episodic online game created by multi-award-winning interactive theatre makers Hidden Track, in collaboration with you, the player.

Each new episode will be created in response to your suggestions. Give us your ideas, vote on your favourites, shape or derail the future of our story.

In these difficult times, can we find a way that everyone can win?
--

Commissioned by Harrogate Theatres as part of HOME Theatre's HOMEMakers: a series of new commissions inviting artists to create new works at home, for an audience who are also at home. The commissions are an offer to ground-breaking artists to challenge the definition of 'live performance' and have been made possible thanks to HOME’s Response Fund, set up in the wake of the announcement that arts venues across the country would close due to the coronavirus. 

The show is available on a Pay What You Decide basis with any income shared between the artists and Harrogate Theatre's Emergency fund. 

Part 1 is available from June 18th and we will build the story together in future instlaments between now and August.

Book via: https://homemcr.org/event/homemakers/ 

Header Image Credit: Hidden Track

Author

Beccy Smith

Beccy Smith

This author has no bio :(

0 Comments

Post A Comment

You must be signed in to post a comment. Click here to sign in now

You might also like

Defining a nation: Cameroonian youth's war on words

Defining a nation: Cameroonian youth's war on words

by Rosie Doyle

Read now