A-level grades increase for the first time in six years

Top grades increase but new style exams prove harder to ace

A-level grades increase for the first time in six years

Top A-level grades have increased for the first time in six years, as teenagers across England, Northern Ireland and Wales get their results back.

A* and A grades were awarded to 26.3% of entries, which is an increase of 0.5% over 2016 results.

Males have also overtaken females in attaining top grades. 26.6 of boys got A* and A grades, while 26.1% of females achieved the same. Across the board, 97.9% of pupils for A* to E passes.

Despite this increase in top grades, the number of university places allocated has dropped 2% on last year, with Ucas saying that 416,000 places have been confirmed already. This drop is expected to create a "buyer's market" - where students have more freedom to pick a university.

Applications from the UK and the EU as a whole have fallen over last year, and the number of 18-year-olds applying have fallen too.

Grades for subjects with new style exams drop

13 subjects in England, including history, English, physics, chemistry and Biology were subject to a new qualification style, whereby a grade is decided purely by final exams, and no contribution by AS-levels or coursework.

Although the overall top mark results have increased, in these new-style subjects there was a 0.7% decline in the number of top marks obtained.

Exam boards state that this is not the result of exams being made more challenging, but that this year produced a lower-achieving group of students.


Did you get your results today? Were they what you expected?

If not, there is absolutely no need to worry - visit UCAS Clearing to get more information as to your options.

Photo: Hammersmith & Fulham Council

Author

Tom Inniss

Tom Inniss Voice Team

Tom is the Editor of Voice. He is a politics graduate and holds a masters in journalism, with particular interest in youth political engagement and technology. He is also a mentor to our Voice Contributors, and champions our festivals programme, including the reporter team at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe..

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