We're all screwed if we don't take action now

Those who know me well know that I cherish the opportunity to educate people on our inevitable extinction if we don’t do something to fix climate change. The Global Climate Strike In London is another great chance for me to decry our preventable doom

We're all screwed if we don't take action now

Those who know me well know that I cherish the opportunity to educate people on how screwed we all are if we don’t do something to fix climate change. The Global Climate Strike In London is another great chance for me to decry our preventable doom

Currently, the UK Government has set a target of 2050 to achieve a net-zero emission rate, despite scientists warnings saying this is far too late to prevent irreversible climate change. The majority of countries that signed the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015 have either already fallen behind their targets, or failed to even start working on them. To add to that, Trump has pulled America out all together so he can set about re-igniting the numerous rust belts across the country because, to him, climate change is all one big hoax. Unfortunately, as a planet we either need to make rapid changes on an inter-governmental scale or my generation will die due to the effects of climate change, not cancer. 

This is something that I truly think was always present at the back of my mind while I was studying A-Level Geography, but it was also so unimaginably terrifying I focused instead on the few meagre positive climate news stories, like the UK going without coal power for hours and then multiple days at a time. I distinctly remember thinking that ‘surely things are on the up, right?’ but a Swedish teenagerl and some bitter honesty has shown me that they really (really) aren’t. 

Brexit continues to dominate the political and news agenda, and whether we leave on 31st October or not, that is likely to be the case for the foreseeable future. As a result, when our politicians should be campaigning for measures to help the country reach its zero emission target early, they’re all hung up on what kind of ‘deal’ we want from the EU, all while our planet continues to suffer. 

Those in this country who aren’t already taking part in Climate Marches might not quite understand why they’re so important for our future. After attending the largest Climate Strike the UK has ever seen; it’s safe to say that at the very least they can provide a vital sense of hope amongst, what feels like, constant negativity in today’s headlines. 

On the banks of the river Thames, there was the realest sense of community I’ve ever felt in my life. I saw people from every single walk of life come together to demand that the Government take real action to address the crisis that we’re now in, not just pass placating but ultimately meaningless legislation that’s designed purely to silence the thousands of protesters outside Parliament. 

Instead of being afraid of their own teenage constituents, and patting themselves on the back for their nonsensical 2050 target, these politicians should instead be concerning themselves with the adverse impact our fishing and farming industries are having, and investing in renewable energy. They should be scared of the rapid erosion of our shores, that will eventually create thousands of climate refugees. They need to act now before their beloved Houses of Parliament succumb to the same fate as everyone else.  

The next Global Climate March is scheduled for 27 September. There will be millions of marches worldwide, so there is little excuse not to go and make your voice heard.  

Header Image Credit: Sophie McCarthy

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Sophie McCarthy

Sophie McCarthy Contributor

I'm a freelance photography working primarily within music and I write a lot of the music stuff on here, including the 'monthly music news' blogs so look out for those! I'm based in London and currently intern at an artist and tour management company with offices in Metropolis Studios and love writing for Voice whenever I can...

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