An introduction: The Arts & Anti-bullying

The anti-bullying movement should be one of the most advantageous and viral campaigns in the world. But often we forget that art can help victims and perpetrators of bullying overcome more obstacles than imaginable.

An introduction: The Arts & Anti-bullying

As my first blog post on this website as an Arts Award voice reporter, I'd like to introduce myself with a quote from Tom in this week's news report…

"Isis Sky is a vlogger, and in her own words, wants to spread more happiness and positivity in the world."

Perhaps there's a little more to say of myself, but I admit it is true. I was thrilled to be part of Arts Award Voice's September residential for the existing and new Voice Reporters/ Activists. It provided a forum to share our love, experience and curiosity for a broad and varied range of the arts. We collectively embraced how it has changed all of our lives. Now energised and imbued with a passion for a diverse range of art forms, we have learnt techniques to voice how we feel through articles on this website. For me, it's all happiness, change, and positivity. Tom's right- I'll be doing my best, one post at a time!

I'd like to touch on a topic today that fits this theme of optimism, and is something close to my heart. I should mention now that I have first hand experience of bullying- so with your indulgence, I will not go in extreme depth about what a victim of bullying goes through. Nonetheless, I have felt the results of my closest friends and family suffering from traumatic experiences as a result of bullying. It's not something to joke about.

The viral anti-bullying movement that pervades both the internet and 'real world' promotes a fantastic message. The campaigns are true: we should stand up to bullying. I know this myself. But there's something eating away at the tip of this problem. Looking forward, how can victims truly get out of an emotional pit? And here's the rub - how can we do this without the aid of helplines and peer support groups? Let's say…independently?

"Art is the daughter of freedom"

- Friedrich Schiller; German playwright

There is no one way we can define art in this modern day and age. Creativity opens more doors of opportunity than ever before, and we don't always realise it. Only through art can we grow and evolve with a sense of connection to the world around us. For example, performances engage audiences both visually and emotionally, becoming a culturally diverse art form. The causes and effects of bullying, can be addressed by one small change: Art.

Art can give us more confidence than you might think. Behind the scenes, artists collaborate and cooperate, communicate and create. There is no professional definition to being an artist, and that is why art can stimulate our senses to achieve more than what seems plausible to our conscious minds.


My idea behind this:
Confidence stems from self-belief, which can be developed through physical and emotional activities in the arts.


Art can expand your environment, and offer a more enriching lifestyle. You can try a mood-booster challenge right now, to reflect on the positives of your own life.

Draw a spiral, and in the centre of that spiral, draw a small stick-figure. That person is You. The Art around you is the curve, dip, the rollercoaster of imagination that will only keep expanding as you see more of it in the world. What's in your personal spiral? How can you add to it?

This is why art is so important for overcoming not just bullying, but other major issues in the world. The first step is to allow ourselves to see the art no matter where we go, and positive results will arise.

Next week: Seeing art in the world around us

~Love and light,

Isis

x

1 Comments

  • Diana Walton

    On 6 October 2016, 08:34 Diana Walton Voice Team commented:

    Very interesting piece Isis! Young people often say that the big thing about doing Arts Award is that it builds confidence and self-belief, which totally fits with your message here. Looking forward to you next post!

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